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Search Result: - 618


Shelley Powers photo

JavaScript Cookbook 2nd Edition
Author: Shelley Powers
Pages: 166
دوره آموزش Javascript
1. The JavaScript Not-So-Simple Building Blocks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31.1. Differentiating Between a JavaScript Object Primitive and Literal 31.2. Extracting a List from a String 71.3. Checking for an Existing Nonempty String 101.4. Inserting Special Characters 141.5. Replacing Patterns with New Strings 161.6. Finding and Highlighting All Instances of a Pattern 181.7. Swapping Words in a String Using Capturing Parentheses 221.8. Replacing HTML Tags with Named Entities 251.9. Converting an ISO 8601 Formatted Date to a Date Object AcceptableFormat 251.10. Using Function Closures with Timers 291.11. Tracking Elapsed Time 311.12. Converting a Decimal to a Hexadecimal Value 321.13. Summing All Numbers in a Table Column 331.14. Converting Between Degrees and Radians 361.15. Find the Radius and Center of a Circle to Fit Within a Page Element 371.16. Calculating the Length of a Circular Arc 391.17. Using ES6 String Extras Without Leaving Users in the Dirt 402. JavaScript Arrays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432.1. Searching Through an Array 432.2. Flattening a Two-Dimensional Array with concat() and apply() 452.3. Removing or Replacing Array Elements 462.4. Extracting a Portion of an Array 48
2.5. Applying a Function Against Each Array Element 482.6. Traversing the Results from querySelectorAll() with forEach() and call() 502.7. Applying a Function to Every Element in an Array and Returning a NewArray 512.8. Creating a Filtered Array 522.9. Validating Array Contents 522.10. Using an Associative Array to Store Form Element Names and Values 542.11. Using a Destructuring Assignment to Simplify Code 583. Functions: The JavaScript Building Blocks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613.1. Placing Your Function and Hoisting 613.2. Passing a Function As an Argument to Another Function 633.3. Implementing a Recursive Algorithm 653.4. Preventing Code Blocking with a Timer and a Callback 683.5. Creating a Function That Remembers Its State 723.6. Converting Function Arguments into an Array 753.7. Reducing Redundancy by Using a Partial Application 773.8. Improving Application Performance with Memoization (CachingCalculations) 803.9. Using an Anonymous Function to Wrap Global Variables 823.10. Providing a Default Parameter 834. The Malleable JavaScript Object. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 854.1. Keeping Object Members Private 864.2. Using Prototype to Create Objects 874.3. Inheriting an Object’s Functionality 904.4. Extending an Object by Defining a New Property 924.5. Preventing Object Extensibility 944.6. Preventing Any Changes to an Object 954.7. Namespacing Your JavaScript Objects 974.8. Rediscovering this with Prototype.bind 1004.9. Chaining Your Object’s Methods 1035. JavaScript and Directly Accessing the User Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1075.1. Accessing a Given Element and Finding Its Parent and Child Elements 1075.2. Accessing All Images in the Web Page 1105.3. Discovering All Images in Articles Using the Selectors API 1165.4. Setting an Element’s Style Attribute 1195.5. Applying a Striped Theme to an Unordered List 1225.6. Finding All Elements That Share an Attribute 1235.7. Inserting a New Paragraph 1245.8. Adding Text to a New Paragraph 125

 2021-05-12 03:01:21 |  136 | Naser

Yap Chin Hoong photo

راهنمای کامل مسیریابی CCNP
Author: Yap Chin Hoong
Pages: 532
Some Titles:
Designing IP Networks
Advanced IP Addressing
On-Demand Routing RIPv2 and Routing Principles
EIGRP Lab
OSPF in a Single Area Lab
Interconnecting Multiple OSPF Areas
Advanced OSPF – OSPF Stub Areas and OSPF Virtual Links
Route Redistribution and Manipulating Routing Updates
Policy-Based Routing and IP SLA (Service-Level Agreement)
BGP Route Summarization Route Filtering and Route Reflection
Advanced BGP – Path Manipulation and Multihoming
Integrated IS-IS Lab
IP Multicast Routing Lab
Cisco IOS Packet Switching Architectures
Cisco IOS Image Naming Convention Packaging and Deployment
ICMP and ICMPv6 Type and Code Numbers
CCNP ROUTE Extra Knowledge

 2021-05-06 12:59:13 |  148 | Naser

Eric Clayberg Dan Rubel photo

Eclipse Plug-ins
Author: Eric Clayberg Dan Rubel
Pages: 929
Foreword by Skip McGaughey xxxiiiForeword by Simon Archer xxxvPreface xxxviiChapter 1 Using Eclipse Tools 11.1 Getting Started 11.1.1 Getting Eclipse 11.1.2 Installation 31.2 The Eclipse Workbench 31.2.1 Perspectives views and editors 51.2.2 Actions 111.3 Setting Up Your Environment 141.3.1 Workbench preferences 151.3.2 Java preferences 171.3.3 Importing and exporting preferences 18
1.4 Creating a Project 191.4.1 Using the new Java Project wizard 191.4.2 .classpath and .project files 221.4.3 Using the Java Package wizard 241.4.4 Using the Java Class wizard 241.5 Navigating 261.5.1 Open Type dialog 261.5.2 Type Hierarchy view 271.5.3 Go to Line 271.5.4 Outline view 271.5.5 Quick Access 281.6 Searching 281.6.1 File Search 281.6.2 Java Search 301.6.3 Other Search menu options 321.6.4 Working sets 331.7 Writing Code 351.7.1 Java editor 351.7.2 Templates 401.7.3 Refactoring 421.7.4 Local history 461.7.5 File extension associations 471.8 Team Development Using CVS 491.8.1 Getting started with CVS 501.8.2 Checking out a project from CVS 511.8.3 Synchronizing with the repository 521.8.4 Comparing and replacing resources 531.8.5 CVS label decorators 54
1.9 Running Applications 551.9.1 Launching Java applications 561.9.2 Launch configurations 571.10 Introduction to Debugging 591.10.1 Setting breakpoints 591.10.2 Using the Debug view 611.10.3 Using the Variables view 621.10.4 Using the Expressions view 621.11 Introduction to Testing 631.11.1 Creating test cases 631.11.2 Running test cases 641.12 Introduction to Mylyn 651.12.1 Using Mylyn to search Bugzilla 671.13 Summary 69Chapter 2 A Simple Plug-in Example 712.1 The Favorites Plug-in 712.2 Creating a Plug-in Project 722.2.1 New Plug-in Project wizard 722.2.2 Define the plug-in 732.2.3 Define the view 752.3 Reviewing the Generated Code 772.3.1 The Plug-in manifests 772.3.2 The Activator or Plug-in class 832.3.3 The Favorites view 842.4 Building a Product 862.4.1 Building manually 872.4.2 Building with Apache Ant 89
2.5 Installing and Running the Product 922.6 Debugging the Product 942.6.1 Creating a configuration 942.6.2 Selecting plug-ins and fragments 952.6.3 Launching the Runtime Workbench 962.7 PDE Views 962.7.1 The Plug-in Registry view 962.7.2 The Plug-ins view 972.7.3 The Plug-in Dependencies view 972.7.4 Plug-in Artifact Search 982.7.5 Plug-in Spy 992.8 Writing Plug-in Tests 992.8.1 Test preparation 1002.8.2 Creating a Plug-in test project 1002.8.3 Creating a Plug-in test 1002.8.4 Running a Plug-in test 1032.8.5 Uninstalling the Favorites plug-in 1042.9 Book Samples 1052.10 Summary 106Chapter 3 Eclipse Infrastructure 1073.1 Structural Overview 1073.1.1 Plug-in structure 1083.1.2 Workspace 1103.2 Plug-in Directory or JAR file 1103.2.1 Link files 1113.2.2 Hybrid approach 113
3.3 Plug-in Manifest 1133.3.1 Plug-in declaration 1143.3.2 Plug-in runtime 1163.3.3 Plug-in dependencies 1163.3.4 Extensions and extension points 1183.4 Activator or Plug-in Class 1203.4.1 Startup and shutdown 1203.4.2 Early plug-in startup 1213.4.3 Static plug-in resources 1213.4.4 Plug-in preferences 1223.4.5 Plug-in configuration files 1233.4.6 Plugin and AbstractUIPlugin 1253.5 Plug-in Model 1263.5.1 Platform 1263.5.2 Plug-ins and Bundles 1273.5.3 Plug-in extension registry 1283.6 Logging 1283.6.1 Status objects 1303.6.2 The Error Log view 1313.6.3 Handling Errors (and other Status) 1313.7 Eclipse Plug-ins 1323.8 Summary 133Chapter 4 The Standard Widget Toolkit 1354.1 SWT History and Goals 1354.2 SWT Widgets 1384.2.1 Simple stand-alone example 1384.2.2 Widget lifecycle 1414.2.3 Widget events 142
4.2.4 Abstract widget classes 1444.2.5 Top-level classes 1484.2.6 Useful widgets 1514.2.7 Menus 1744.2.8 Additional widgets 1784.3 Layout Management 1784.3.1 FillLayout 1794.3.2 RowLayout 1804.3.3 GridLayout 1824.3.4 FormLayout 1854.4 Resource Management 1884.4.1 Colors 1894.4.2 Fonts 1894.4.3 Images 1894.5 GUI Builders 1904.6 Summary 191Chapter 5 JFace Viewers 1935.1 List-Oriented Viewers 1935.1.1 Label providers 1945.1.2 Content providers 1955.1.3 Viewer sorters 1975.1.4 Viewer filters 1975.1.5 StructuredViewer class 1985.1.6 ListViewer class 2005.1.7 TableViewer class 2035.1.8 TreeViewer class 2075.2 Text Viewers 2115.3 Summary 214
Chapter 6 Commands and Actions 2156.1 Commands 2166.1.1 Defining a command 2166.2 Menu and Toolbar Contributions 2206.2.1 Defining a top level menu 2206.2.2 Adding to an existing top level menu 2216.2.3 Defining a top level toolbar item 2216.2.4 Limiting top level menu and toolbar item visibility 2226.2.5 Defining a selection-based context menu item 2236.2.6 Defining a view-specific menu or toolbar item 2286.2.7 Defining an editor-specific menu or toolbar item 2296.2.8 Dynamic menu contributions 2306.2.9 locationURI 2306.2.10 visibleWhen expression 2316.3 Handlers 2366.3.1 Creating a new IHandler 2376.4 Key Bindings 2386.5 IAction versus IActionDelegate 2406.6 Workbench Window Actions 2426.6.1 Defining a workbench window menu 2436.6.2 Groups in a menu 2456.6.3 Defining a menu item and toolbar button 2456.6.4 Action images 2476.6.5 Insertion points 2486.6.6 Creating an action delegate 2496.6.7 Manually testing the new action 2526.6.8 Adding a test for the new action 2536.6.9 Discussion 255
6.7 Object Actions 2576.7.1 Defining an object-based action 2576.7.2 Action filtering and enablement 2606.7.3 IObjectActionDelegate 2666.7.4 Creating an object-based submenu 2676.7.5 Manually testing the new action 2686.7.6 Adding a test for the new action 2686.8 View Actions 2706.8.1 Defining a view context submenu 2706.8.2 Defining a view context menu action 2716.8.3 IViewActionDelegate 2736.8.4 Defining a view toolbar action 2736.8.5 Defining a view pull-down submenu and action 2746.8.6 Manually testing the new actions 2756.8.7 Adding tests for the new actions 2756.8.8 View context menu identifiers 2756.9 Editor Actions 2776.9.1 Defining an editor context menu 2786.9.2 Defining an editor context action 2796.9.3 IEditorActionDelegate 2796.9.4 Defining an editor top-level menu 2806.9.5 Defining an editor top-level action 2816.9.6 Defining an editor toolbar action 2826.9.7 Adding tests for the new actions 2836.9.8 Editor context menu identifiers 2836.10 Actions and Key Bindings 2846.10.1 Associating commands with actions 2846.10.2 Keyboard accessibility 285
6.11 RFRS Considerations 2866.11.1 Global action labels (RFRS 5.3.5.1) 2866.12 Summary 287Chapter 7 Views 2897.1 View Declaration 2917.1.1 Declaring a view category 2917.1.2 Declaring a view 2927.2 View Part 2937.2.1 View methods 2937.2.2 View controls 2947.2.3 View model 2957.2.4 Content provider 3067.2.5 Label provider 3077.2.6 Viewer sorter 3087.2.7 Viewer filters 3117.2.8 View selection 3127.2.9 Implementing a propertyTester 3127.3 View Commands 3137.3.1 Model command handlers 3137.3.2 Context menu 3147.3.3 Toolbar buttons 3187.3.4 Pull-down menu 3197.3.5 Keyboard commands 3207.3.6 Global commands 3217.3.7 Clipboard commands 3227.3.8 Drag-and-drop support 3267.3.9 Inline editing 333
7.4 Linking the View 3367.4.1 Selection provider 3377.4.2 Adaptable objects 3377.4.3 Selection listener 3387.4.4 Opening an editor 3397.5 Saving View State 3407.5.1 Saving local view information 3407.5.2 Saving global view information 3437.6 Testing 3457.7 Image Caching 3467.8 Auto-sizing Table Columns 3487.9 RFRS Considerations 3487.9.1 Views for navigation (RFRS 3.5.15) 3487.9.2 Views save immediately (RFRS 3.5.16) 3497.9.3 View initialization (RFRS 3.5.17) 3497.9.4 View global actions (RFRS 3.5.18) 3497.9.5 Persist view state (RFRS 3.5.19) 3507.9.6 Register context menus (RFRS 5.3.5.8) 3507.9.7 Action filters for views (RFRS 5.3.5.9) 3517.10 Summary 352Chapter 8 Editors 3538.1 Editor Declaration 3548.2 Editor Part 3588.2.1 Editor methods 3588.2.2 Editor controls 3608.2.3 Editor model 3638.2.4 Content provider 3698.2.5 Label provider 370
8.3 Editing 3728.3.1 Cell editors 3728.3.2 Change listeners 3748.3.3 Cell validators 3768.3.4 Editing versus selecting 3778.4 Editor Lifecycle 3788.4.1 Dirty editors 3788.4.2 Switching pages 3798.4.3 Saving content 3818.5 Editor Commands 3818.5.1 Context menu 3818.5.2 Editor contributor 3848.5.3 Editor commands rather than editor contributor 3898.5.4 Undo/Redo 3928.5.5 Clipboard actions 4008.6 Linking the Editor 4008.7 RFRS Considerations 4018.7.1 Using an editor to edit or browse (RFRS 3.5.9) 4018.7.2 Editor lifecycle (RFRS 3.5.10) 4018.7.3 Accessing global actions (RFRS 3.5.11) 4028.7.4 Closing when the object is deleted (RFRS 3.5.12) 4038.7.5 Synchronize external changes (RFRS 3.5.14) 4038.7.6 Registering editor menus (RFRS 5.3.5.2) 4038.7.7 Editor action filters (RFRS 5.3.5.3) 4048.7.8 Unsaved editor modifications (RFRS 5.3.5.4) 4048.7.9 Prefix dirty resources (RFRS 5.3.5.5) 4048.7.10 Editor outline view (RFRS 5.3.5.6) 4058.7.11 Synchronize with outline view (RFRS 5.3.5.7) 4058.8 Summary 405
Chapter 9 Resource Change Tracking 4079.1 IResourceChangeListener 4079.1.1 IResourceChangeEvent 4089.1.2 IResourceDelta 4099.2 Processing Change Events 4119.3 Batching Change Events 4149.4 Progress Monitor 4159.4.1 IProgressMonitor 4159.4.2 Classes for displaying progress 4169.4.3 Workbench window status bar 4189.4.4 IProgressService 4199.5 Delayed Changed Events 4209.6 Summary 421Chapter 10 Perspectives 42310.1 Creating a Perspective 42310.1.1 Perspective extension point 42410.1.2 Perspective factories 42610.1.3 IPageLayout 42910.2 Enhancing an Existing Perspective 43010.2.1 Adding views and placeholders 43210.2.2 Adding shortcuts 43410.2.3 Adding action sets 43610.3 RFRS Considerations 43810.3.1 Create for long-lived tasks (RFRS 5.3.5.10) 43810.3.2 Extend existing perspectives (RFRS 5.3.5.11) 43810.3.3 Add actions to the window menu (RFRS 5.3.5.15) 43910.4 Summary 439
Chapter 11 Dialogs and Wizards 44111.1 Dialogs 44111.1.1 SWT dialogs versus JFace dialogs 44211.1.2 Common SWT dialogs 44211.1.3 Common JFace dialogs 44311.1.4 Creating a JFace dialog 44611.1.5 Dialog units 44811.1.6 Initial dialog location and size 44911.1.7 Resizable dialogs 45011.1.8 Favorites view filter dialog 45011.1.9 Details dialog 45411.1.10 Opening a dialog—finding a parent shell 46211.2 Wizards 46411.2.1 IWizard 46511.2.2 IWizardPage 46711.2.3 IWizardContainer 46811.2.4 Nested wizards 46911.2.5 Launching a wizard 46911.2.6 Wizard example 47311.2.7 Dialog settings 47511.2.8 Page content based on selection 47511.2.9 Page content based on previous page 48011.3 RFRS Considerations 48211.3.1 Wizard look and feel (RFRS 3.5.2) 48211.3.2 Open new file in editor (RFRS 3.5.6) 48311.3.3 New project switches perspective (RFRS 3.5.7) 48311.3.4 Show new object (RFRS 3.5.8) 48311.3.5 One-page wizard buttons (RFRS 5.3.5.13) 48411.4 Summary 484
Chapter 12 Preference Pages 48512.1 Creating a Preference Page 48512.2 Preference Page APIs 48712.2.1 FieldEditorPreferencePage 48912.2.2 Field editors 49012.2.3 PreferencePage 49412.2.4 Favorites preference page 49512.2.5 Validation 49712.2.6 Nested preference pages 49812.2.7 Tabbed preference pages 50012.3 Preference APIs 50112.3.1 Default preferences 50212.3.2 Accessing preferences 50312.3.3 Specifying default values programmatically 50512.3.4 Specifying default values in a file 50612.3.5 Hooking up the Favorites view 50712.3.6 Listening for preference changes 50712.4 RFRS Considerations 50812.4.1 Preferences dialog use (RFRS 3.5.25) 50812.5 Summary 509Chapter 13 Properties 51113.1 Creating Properties 51113.1.1 FavoriteItem properties 51213.1.2 Resource properties 51313.2 Displaying Properties in the Properties Dialog 51513.2.1 Declaring a Property page 51513.2.2 Creating a resource Property page 519
13.2.3 Creating a Favorites item resource page 52113.2.4 Opening the Properties dialog 52213.2.5 IColorProvider 52313.3 Displaying Properties in the Properties View 52413.3.1 Properties view API 52513.3.2 Favorite properties in the Properties view 52713.4 Property Pages Reused as Preference Pages 52913.5 RFRS Considerations 53013.5.1 Properties views for quick access (RFRS 3.5.21) 53013.6 Summary 531Chapter 14 Builders Markers and Natures 53314.1 Builders 53514.1.1 Declaring a builder 53514.1.2 IncrementalProjectBuilder 53814.1.3 Derived resources 54514.1.4 Associating a builder with a project 54514.1.5 Invoking builders 54814.2 Markers 54814.2.1 Marker types 54914.2.2 Creating and deleting markers 55114.2.3 Marker attributes 55314.2.4 Marker resolution—quick fix 55614.2.5 Finding markers 56114.3 Natures 56114.3.1 Declaring a nature 56214.3.2 Associating builders and natures 56414.3.3 IProjectNature 56514.3.4 Required natures 566
14.3.5 Conflicting natures 56714.3.6 Nature image 56714.3.7 Associating a nature with a project 56814.4 RFRS Considerations 57214.4.1 Use builders to convert resources (RFRS 3.8.1) 57214.4.2 Do not replace existing builders (RFRS 3.8.3) 57314.4.3 Do not misuse the term “build” (RFRS 5.3.8.1) 57314.4.4 Mark created resources as “derived” (RFRS 5.3.8.2) 57314.4.5 Respond to clean-build requests (RFRS 5.3.8.3) 57414.4.6 Use IResourceProxy when possible (RFRS 5.3.8.4) 57414.4.7 Builders must be added by natures (RFRS 5.3.8.5) 57514.5 Summary 575Chapter 15 Implementing Help 57715.1 Using Help 57715.2 Implementing Help 58015.2.1 Creating a new help project 58115.2.2 Plug-in manifest files 58515.2.3 Table of contents (toc) files 58615.2.4 Creating HTML content 58915.3 Context-Sensitive Help (F1) 59115.3.1 Associating context IDs with items 59215.3.2 IWorkbenchHelpSystem API 59415.3.3 Creating context-sensitive help content 59515.3.4 Context extension point 59515.3.5 Marker help 59815.4 Accessing Help Programmatically 59915.4.1 Opening a specific help page 59915.4.2 Opening a Web page 600
15.5 Cheat Sheets 60115.5.1 Using a cheat sheet 60115.5.2 Creating a simple cheat sheet 60315.5.3 Registering a cheat sheet 60415.5.4 Adding cheat sheet commands 60715.5.5 Adding command parameters 60915.6 RFRS Considerations 61115.6.1 Provide help through the help system (RFRS 3.7.2) 61115.6.2 Provide all help via the help system (RFRS 5.3.7.1) 61215.6.3 Context help activated using F1 (RFRS 5.3.7.2) 61215.6.4 Implement active help (RFRS 5.3.7.3) 61215.6.5 Use of stand-alone help (RFRS 5.3.7.4) 61315.6.6 Use of additional documentation (RFRS 5.3.7.5) 61315.6.7 Provide an overview of tasks’ flow (RFRS 5.3.5.34) 61315.6.8 Illustrate only one task (RFRS 5.3.5.35) 61415.6.9 Provide help link with each step (RFRS 5.3.5.36) 61415.7 Summary 614Chapter 16 Internationalization 61716.1 Externalizing the Plug-in Manifest 61816.2 Externalizing Plug-in Strings 62016.3 Using Fragments 62916.3.1 New Fragment Project wizard 63016.3.2 Fragment manifest file 63316.3.3 Fragment project contents 63516.4 Manual Testing 63616.5 Summary 636
Chapter 17 Creating New Extension Points 63717.1 The Extension Point Mechanism 63717.2 Defining an Extension Point 63917.2.1 Creating an extension point 63917.2.2 Creating an extension point schema 64117.2.3 Extension point elements and attributes 64317.2.4 Extension point element grammar 64717.3 Code Behind an Extension Point 64917.3.1 Parsing extension information 64917.3.2 Constructing proxies 65117.3.3 Creating executable extensions 65317.3.4 Cleanup 65517.4 Extension Point Documentation 65617.5 Using the Extension Point 65717.6 RFRS Considerations 65917.6.1 Document extension points (RFRS 3.10.5) 65917.6.2 Log errors (RFRS 5.3.10.1) 66017.7 Summary 660Chapter 18 Features Branding and Updates 66118.1 Feature Projects 66218.1.1 Creating a new feature project 66318.1.2 Feature manifest files 66518.1.3 Feature manifest editor 66618.1.4 Testing the Feature 67318.2 Branding 67318.2.1 The about.html file 67418.2.2 The about.ini file 67518.2.3 Product branding 677
18.3 Update Sites 67918.3.1 Creating an update site project 67918.3.2 The site.xml file 68118.3.3 The update Web site 68418.3.4 Revisiting the feature manifest 68518.3.5 Accessing the update site 68518.4 RFRS Considerations 68918.4.1 Do not override product branding (RFRS 3.1.8) 68918.4.2 Branded feature visibility (RFRS 5.3.1.9) 68918.4.3 Include attribution information (RFRS 5.3.1.10) 68918.4.4 about.html file contents (RFRS 5.3.1.11) 69018.4.5 Splash screen restrictions (RFRS 5.3.1.12) 69018.5 Summary 691Chapter 19 Building a Product 69319.1 A Brief Introduction to Ant 69319.1.1 Build projects 69319.1.2 Build targets 69419.1.3 Build tasks 69519.1.4 Build properties 69919.1.5 <antcall> task 70619.1.6 macrodef 70819.1.7 Ant extensions 71019.2 Building with PDE 71119.2.1 PDE Build Overview 71119.2.2 Steps in the PDE Build process 71219.2.3 Directories in the PDE Build process 71419.2.4 PDE Scripts and Templates 71419.2.5 Creating a PDE Build 715
19.2.6 Specifying compilation levels 71719.2.7 Running a PDE Build 71719.2.8 Automatically Generating Version Qualifiers 71919.2.9 Keeping the versions in sync 71919.2.10 Build Properties 72019.2.11 Custom PDE Targets 72319.2.12 Editing with different versions of Eclipse 72519.3 Debugging the PDE Build process 72619.3.1 Auto-generated build scripts 72719.3.2 Using the Debugger 72719.4 Summary 729Chapter 20 GEF: Graphical Editing Framework 73120.1 GEF Architecture 73120.2 GEF Model 73220.3 GEF Controller 73320.3.1 EditPart classes 73420.3.2 Top Level EditPart 73620.3.3 Child EditParts 73720.3.4 Connection EditParts 73920.3.5 EditPartFactory 74220.4 GEF Figures 74320.4.1 IFigure 74320.4.2 Graphics 74520.4.3 Complex Figures 74720.4.4 Connection Figures 75120.4.5 LayoutManager 75120.5 GEF in an Eclipse View 75420.5.1 Listening to Model Changes 757
20.6 GEF in an Eclipse Editor 75820.6.1 Editor Input 75820.6.2 FavoritesManagerEditPart revisited 75920.6.3 Graphical Editor Classes 76020.6.4 FavoritesGEFEditor 76120.6.5 User Interaction with GEF 76320.6.6 Edit Menu 76820.6.7 FreeformLayer and FreeformLayout 77020.6.8 Z-order 77120.6.9 Deleting model objects 77420.7 Palette 77520.7.1 Creating a GEF Palette 77520.7.2 CreateCommand 77620.8 Summary 778Chapter 21 Advanced Topics 77921.1 Advanced Search—Reference Projects 78021.2 Accessing Internal Code 78121.2.1 Eclipse newsgroup 78121.2.2 Bugzilla—Eclipse bug tracking system 78221.2.3 Options for accessing internal code 78221.2.4 How Eclipse is different 78321.2.5 Related plug-ins 78321.2.6 Using fragments 78421.3 Adapters 78421.3.1 IAdaptable 78521.3.2 Using adapters 78521.3.3 Adapter factory 78621.3.4 IWorkbenchAdapter 788
21.4 Opening a Browser or Creating an Email 78821.4.1 IWorkbenchBrowserSupport 78821.4.2 LaunchURL 78921.4.3 OpenEmailAction 79021.5 Types Specified in an Extension Point 79321.5.1 Parameterized types 79421.5.2 Referencing a class in a different plug-in 79621.6 Modifying Eclipse to Find Part Identifiers 79721.6.1 Modifying the Eclipse base 79721.6.2 Creating the global action 79921.6.3 Testing the new utility 80121.6.4 Submitting the change to Eclipse 80121.7 Label Decorators 80221.7.1 Declaring a label decorator 80321.7.2 ILightweightLabelDecorator 80421.7.3 Decorative label decorators 80621.7.4 IDecoratorManager 80721.8 Background Tasks—Jobs API 80821.9 Plug-in ClassLoaders 81121.10 Early Startup 81621.10.1 Managing early startup 81621.10.2 Disabling early startup 81721.11 Rich Client Platform 81721.12 Conclusion 818
Appendix A Eclipse Plug-ins and Resources 819A.1 Plug-ins 819A.1.1 CodePro AnalytiX 819A.1.2 CodePro Profiler 821A.1.3 EclipseUML 822A.1.4 MyEclipse Enterprise Workbench 823A.1.5 WindowBuilder Pro 825A.1.6 WindowTester Pro 827A.2 Resources 828A.2.1 Eclipse.org 828A.2.2 Eclipse Plug-in Central 829A.2.3 Eclipse wiki wiki 829A.2.4 Planet Eclipse 829A.2.5 EclipseCon 830A.2.6 Eclipse Easter eggs 830A.2.7 IBM Alphaworks on Eclipse 830A.2.8 IBM Eclipse research 830A.2.9 QNX Momentics 830Appendix B Ready for Rational Software 831Index 833

 2021-05-06 06:46:54 |  134 | Naser

Ryan Benedetti Ronan Cranley photo

دانلود کتاب Head First jQuery
Author: Ryan Benedetti Ronan Cranley
Pages: 538
دوره  آموزش JQuery
اگر می خواهید یک وب سایت تعاملی با ظاهری جالب توجه طراحی کنید، این کتاب بهترین انتخاب می باشد. با مطالعه ی این کتاب خواهید آموخت چگونه با بهره گیری از کتابخانه ی محبوب jQuery می توانید با نوشتن چند خط کد، قابلیت های بی نظیر به سایت خود اضافه نمایید. با Head First jQuery، به سرعت با امکانات خارق العاده ی این کتابخانه ی JavaScript همچون پیمایش در صفحات HTML، مدیریت event ها، effect های تصویری، توابع callback و پویاسازی المان های UI (animation) آشنا می شوید. پس از فراگیری کامل مباحث کتاب، قادر خواهید بود اپلیکیشن های مبتنی بر تکنولوژی AJAX در برنامه های کاربردی خود گنجانده، به صورت یکپارچه و روان با HTML و CSS کار کنید و اطلاعات را با PHP، MySQL و JSON مدیریت نمایید و غیره ... .
اگر می خواهید بیاموزید – و کاملا بفهمید – چگونه صفحات وب تعاملی، با اسکریپت های نوشته شده با رویکرد unobtrusive (غیر دست و پاگیر) و انیمیشن های کارامدی که باعث هنگ کردن مرورگر نمی شوند، بنویسید، با جرات می توان گفت که این کتاب ویژه ی پاسخگویی به نیازهای شما تعبیه شده است.
با مطالعه ی این کتاب بیاموزید چگونه:

از jQuery با DOM برای غلبه بر محدودیت های HTML و CSS بهره بگیرید
Selector ها و رخدادهای jQuery چگونه با هم کار می کنند
توابع jQuery تعریف کرده و آن را به المان های رابط کاربری متصل کنید
با استفاده از جلوه های بصری و effect های jQuery رخدادها و action های jQuery تعریف نمایید
صفحات اپلیکیشن تحت وب خود را با animation پویا و زنده نمایید
با jQuery و تکنولوژی AJAX صفحات تعاملی (interactive) بنویسید
در اپلیکیشن های تحت وب، فرم بسازید.

Want to add more interactivity and polish to your websites? Discover how jQuery can help you build complex scripting functionality in just a few lines of code. With Head First jQuery youll quickly get up to speed on this amazing JavaScript library by learning how to navigate HTML documents while handling events effects callbacks and animations. By the time youve completed the book youll be incorporating Ajax apps working seamlessly with HTML and CSS and handling data with PHP MySQL and JSON.
If you want to learn—and understand—how to create interactive web pages unobtrusive script and cool animations that dont kill your browser this book is for you.

Use jQuery with DOM to overcome the limitations of HTML and CSS
Learn how jQuery selectors and actions work together
Write functions and wire them to interface elements
Use jQuery effects to create actions on the page
Make your pages come alive with animation
Build interactive web pages with jQuery and Ajax
Build forms in web applications

 

Series: Brain-Friendly Guides
Paperback: 540 pages
Publisher: OReilly Media; 1 edition (October 2 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1449393217
ISBN-13: 978-1449393212
Product Dimensions: 8 x 1.5 x 9.2 inches


 2021-05-06 12:58:44 |  171 | Naser

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ASP.NET 4-Social Networking
Author: atul gupta-sudhanshu hate
Pages: 485
Chapter 1: Social Networking
Chapter 2: An Enterprise Approach to our Community Framework
Chapter 3: User Accounts
Chapter 4: User Profiles
Chapter 5: Friends
Chapter 6: Messaging
Chapter 7: Media Galleries
Chapter 8: Blogs
Chapter 9: Forums
Chapter 10: Groups
Chapter 11: User Interactivity
Chapter 12: Moderation
Chapter 13: Scaling

 2021-05-09 11:27:57 |  246 | Naser

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HOW TO DESIGN AND WRITE WEB PAGES TODAY
Author: Karl Stolley
Pages: 330
CONTENTSSeries Foreword ixPreface xiAcknowledgments xxiPART I. WHAT AM I WRITING?Chapter 1 Why Write for the Web? 3Chapter 2 Reading the Web 13Chapter 3 Creating Web Content 25Chapter 4 Standards-Based Web Pages 33Chapter 5 Preparing to Write and Design 43PART II. ISSUES AND CHALLENGESChapter 6 Accessibility 57Chapter 7 Usability 69Chapter 8 Sustainability 81
PART III. STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSChapter 9 Structured Content: XHTML Overview 91Chapter 10 Presentation and Design: CSS Overview 103Chapter 11 Rapid Prototyping 121Chapter 12 Writing with Source in a Text Editor 133Chapter 13 Page Metadata 147Chapter 14 Page Branding 159Chapter 15 Navigation 177Chapter 16 Text Content 189Chapter 17 Page Layout 205Chapter 18 Multimedia Content 225Chapter 19 Performance and Interaction 235PART IV. PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONSChapter 20 Site Architecture 249Chapter 21 Reusing and Dynamically Generating Content 257Chapter 22 Dynamic Sites in WordPress 267Chapter 23 Going Live 275Chapter 24 Tracking Visitors Sharing Content 281Resources for the Future 289Glossary 295Index 299

 2021-05-11 06:30:52 |  157 | Naser

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 2021-05-08 23:58:21 |  128 | Naser

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Network Security Assessment 2nd Edition
Author: chris mcnab
Pages: 506
Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiPreface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv1. Network Security Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1The Business Benefits 1IP: The Foundation of the Internet 2Classifying Internet-Based Attackers 2Assessment Service Definitions 3Network Security Assessment Methodology 4The Cyclic Assessment Approach 82. Network Security Assessment Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10Virtualization Software 10Operating Systems 11Reconnaissance Tools 13Network Scanning Tools 13Exploitation Frameworks 14Web Application Testing Tools 163. Internet Host and Network Enumeration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17Querying Web and Newsgroup Search Engines 18Querying Domain WHOIS Registrars 20Querying IP WHOIS Registrars 23BGP Querying 28DNS Querying 30Web Server Crawling 37Automating Enumeration 37
SMTP Probing 38Enumeration Technique Recap 39Enumeration Countermeasures 404. IP Network Scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42ICMP Probing 42TCP Port Scanning 49UDP Port Scanning 60IDS Evasion and Filter Circumvention 62Low-Level IP Assessment 71Network Scanning Recap 76Network Scanning Countermeasures 775. Assessing Remote Information Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79Remote Information Services 79DNS 80Finger 86Auth 88NTP 89SNMP 91LDAP 95rwho 98RPC rusers 98Remote Information Services Countermeasures 996. Assessing Web Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101Web Servers 101Fingerprinting Accessible Web Servers 102Identifying and Assessing Reverse Proxy Mechanisms 107Enumerating Virtual Hosts and Web Sites 113Identifying Subsystems and Enabled Components 114Investigating Known Vulnerabilities 132Basic Web Server Crawling 155Web Servers Countermeasures 1587. Assessing Web Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160Web Application Technologies Overview 160Web Application Profiling 161Web Application Attack Strategies 170
Web Application Vulnerabilities 180Web Security Checklist 1968. Assessing Remote Maintenance Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198Remote Maintenance Services 198FTP 199SSH 212Telnet 215R-Services 220X Windows 224Citrix 229Microsoft Remote Desktop Protocol 232VNC 234Remote Maintenance Services Countermeasures 2379. Assessing Database Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239Microsoft SQL Server 239Oracle 244MySQL 252Database Services Countermeasures 25510. Assessing Windows Networking Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256Microsoft Windows Networking Services 256Microsoft RPC Services 257The NetBIOS Name Service 273The NetBIOS Datagram Service 275The NetBIOS Session Service 276The CIFS Service 285Unix Samba Vulnerabilities 287Windows Networking Services Countermeasures 28811. Assessing Email Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290Email Service Protocols 290SMTP 290POP-2 and POP-3 302IMAP 303Email Services Countermeasures 305

 2021-05-12 11:13:27 |  121 | Naser

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Mastering Object-oriented Python
Author: Steven F. Lott
Pages: 634
About casino Blackjack 10Playing the game 10Blackjack player strategies 11Object design for simulating Blackjack 12Performance – the timeit module 12Testing – unittest and doctest 13Unit testing and technology spikes 15Docstrings – RST markup and documentation tools 16The IDE question 17About special method names 18Summary 19Part 1: Pythonic Classes via Special MethodsChapter 1: The __init__() Method 25The implicit superclass – object 25The base class object __init__() method 26Implementing __init__() in a superclass 27Using __init__() to create manifest constants 28Leveraging __init__() via a factory function 30Faulty factory design and the vague else clause 31Simplicity and consistency using elif sequences 32Simplicity using mapping and class objects 33Two parallel mappings 34Mapping to a tuple of values 34The partial function solution 34Fluent APIs for factories 35

 2021-05-12 03:00:03 |  161 | Naser

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Network Security Hacks 2nd Edition
Author: Andrew Lockhart
Pages: 480
Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiPreface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvChapter 1. Unix Host Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Secure Mount Points 22. Scan for SUID and SGID Programs 33. Scan for World- and Group-Writable Directories 54. Create Flexible Permissions Hierarchies with POSIX ACLs 55. Protect Your Logs from Tampering 96. Delegate Administrative Roles 117. Automate Cryptographic Signature Verification 138. Check for Listening Services 159. Prevent Services from Binding to an Interface 1710. Restrict Services with Sandboxed Environments 1911. Use proftpd with a MySQL Authentication Source 2312. Prevent Stack-Smashing Attacks 2613. Lock Down Your Kernel with grsecurity 2814. Restrict Applications with grsecurity 3315. Restrict System Calls with systrace 3616. Create systrace Policies Automatically 3917. Control Login Access with PAM 4118. Restrict Users to SCP and SFTP 4619. Use Single-Use Passwords for Authentication 4920. Restrict Shell Environments 52
21. Enforce User and Group Resource Limits 5422. Automate System Updates 55Chapter 2. Windows Host Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5823. Check Servers for Applied Patches 5924. Use Group Policy to Configure Automatic Updates 6325. List Open Files and Their Owning Processes 6626. List Running Services and Open Ports 6827. Enable Auditing 6928. Enumerate Automatically Executed Programs 7129. Secure Your Event Logs 7330. Change Your Maximum Log File Sizes 7331. Back Up and Clear the Event Logs 7532. Disable Default Shares 7833. Encrypt Your Temp Folder 7934. Back Up EFS 8035. Clear the Paging File at Shutdown 8636. Check for Passwords That Never Expire 88Chapter 3. Privacy and Anonymity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9137. Evade Traffic Analysis 9138. Tunnel SSH Through Tor 9539. Encrypt Your Files Seamlessly 9640. Guard Against Phishing 10041. Use the Web with Fewer Passwords 10542. Encrypt Your Email with Thunderbird 10743. Encrypt Your Email in Mac OS X 112Chapter 4. Firewalling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11744. Firewall with Netfilter 11745. Firewall with OpenBSD’s PacketFilter 12246. Protect Your Computer with the Windows Firewall 12847. Close Down Open Ports and Block Protocols 13748. Replace the Windows Firewall 13949. Create an Authenticated Gateway 14750. Keep Your Network Self-Contained 149
51. Test Your Firewall 15152. MAC Filter with Netfilter 15453. Block Tor 156Chapter 5. Encrypting and Securing Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15854. Encrypt IMAP and POP with SSL 15855. Use TLS-Enabled SMTP with Sendmail 16156. Use TLS-Enabled SMTP with Qmail 16357. Install Apache with SSL and suEXEC 16458. Secure BIND 16959. Set Up a Minimal and Secure DNS Server 17260. Secure MySQL 17661. Share Files Securely in Unix 178Chapter 6. Network Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18362. Detect ARP Spoofing 18463. Create a Static ARP Table 18664. Protect Against SSH Brute-Force Attacks 18865. Fool Remote Operating System Detection Software 19066. Keep an Inventory of Your Network 19467. Scan Your Network for Vulnerabilities 19768. Keep Server Clocks Synchronized 20769. Create Your Own Certificate Authority 20970. Distribute Your CA to Clients 21371. Back Up and Restore a Certificate Authority with CertificateServices 21472. Detect Ethernet Sniffers Remotely 22173. Help Track Attackers 22774. Scan for Viruses on Your Unix Servers 22975. Track Vulnerabilities 233Chapter 7. Wireless Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23676. Turn Your Commodity Wireless Routers into a SophisticatedSecurity Platform 23677. Use Fine-Grained Authentication for Your Wireless Network 24078. Deploy a Captive Portal 244

 2021-05-09 07:39:55 |  133 | Naser

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Learning Kendo UI Web Development
Author: John Adams
Pages: 289
دوره آموزش MVC
 
Preface 1

 2021-05-07 14:38:24 |  151 | Naser

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Creating Templates with Artisteer
Author: jakub sanecki
Pages: 170
کتاب آموزش جوملا
Chapter 1: Meet the Artisteer 5What is Artisteer 5Artisteer versus other software tools 6Who can use Artisteer 8Hobbyists 8Designers 8Web developers and programmers 9Web development companies 9Your first template in 10 minutes 10Creating a new project 11The program interface 13The Suggestion tool 14Previewing the project 14Initial customizations 15Saving the project 18Exporting the template 20Removing the Footnote 21Summary 22Chapter 2: The Template Step-by-Step 23Templates 23The common parts of a website 24Elements 25Header 25Horizontal menu 25Vertical menu 25Content area 25Special blocks 25Footer 26
Attributes 26Page width 26Typography 27Colors 27Layout 27Creating a template 30Layout 33Columns and their content 36Colors 38Background 38Pages 40Adding removing and renaming the pages 40Page properties 41Header 42Title and slogan 42Pictures 44Shapes 44Ordering shapes and pictures 46Flash 46Menu 47Horizontal menu 47Vertical menu 52Determining the pages displayed in menus 56Content 57Writing articles 62Inserting images 64Inserting a slideshow 67Typography 70Color theme 74Footer 74Summary 77Chapter 3: CMS Templates 79What is CMS 79Static page template versus CMS template 83Specific CMS template elements 88Post header icons 88Post footer icons 89Advanced techniques 90Displaying positions in a Joomla! template 91Additional template position in the header 92Additional template positions in the footer 93

 2021-05-06 06:46:21 |  156 | Naser

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Digital Media Processing DSP Algorithms Using C
Author: Hazarathaiah Malepati
Pages: 947
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ixChapter 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.1 DigitalMedia Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 11.2 Media-Processing Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.3 Embedded Systems and Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41.4 Algorithm Implementation on DSP Architectures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 5Part 1 Data Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13Chapter 2 Data Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152.1 Cryptography Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152.2 Triple Data Encryption Algorithm.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242.3 Advanced Encryption Standard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372.4 Keyed-Hash Message Authentication Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502.5 Elliptic-Curve Digital Signature Algorithm .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58Chapter 3 Introduction to Data Error Correction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 873.1 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 873.2 Error Detection Algorithms .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 883.3 Block Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 973.4 Hamming (72 64) Coder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1013.5 BCH Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1083.6 RS Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1123.7 Convolutional Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1183.8 Trellis Coded Modulation .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1263.9 Viterbi Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1343.10 Turbo Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1363.11 LDPC Codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143Chapter 4 Implementation of Error Correction Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1554.1 BCH Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1554.2 Reed-Solomon Error-Correction Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1664.3 RS Erasure Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1794.4 Viterbi Decoder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1904.5 Turbo Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1994.6 LDPC Codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216Chapter 5 Lossless Data Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2255.1 Entropy Coding.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2265.2 Variable Length Decoding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2315.3 H.264 VLC-Based Entropy Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2425.4 MQ-Decoder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2605.5 Context-Based Adaptive Binary Arithmetic Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Part 2 Digital Signal and Image Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .283Chapter 6 Signals and Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2856.1 Introduction to Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2856.2 Time-Frequency Representation of Continuous-Time Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2996.3 Sampling of Continuous-Time Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3046.4 Time-Frequency Representation of Discrete-Time Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3106.5 Linear Time-Invariant Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3126.6 Generalized Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317Chapter 7 Transforms and Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3217.1 Fast Fourier Transform. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3217.2 Discrete Cosine Transform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3347.3 Filter Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3457.4 Finite Impulse-Response Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3527.5 Infinite Impulse-Response Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363Chapter 8 Advanced Signal Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3818.1 Adaptive Signal Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3818.2 Multirate Signal Processing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4058.3 Wavelet Signal Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4158.4 Simulation and Implementation Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431Chapter 9 Digital Communications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4379.1 Introduction .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4379.2 Single- and Multicarrier Communication Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4549.3 Channel Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4649.4 Channel Equalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4729.5 Synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4919.6 Simulation Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504Chapter 10 Image Processing Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50910.1 Color Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50910.2 Color Enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51010.3 Brightness and Contrast Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51010.4 Edge Enhancement/Sharpening of Edges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51210.5 Image Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51210.6 Edge Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51310.7 Image Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52510.8 Erosion and Dilation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53110.9 Objects Corner Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53410.10 Hough Transform. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53610.11 Simulation of Image Processing Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 540Chapter 11 Advanced Image Processing Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55311.1 Image Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55311.2 Digital Image Stabilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56211.3 Image Objects Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56811.4 2D Image Filters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57511.5 Fisheye Distortion Correction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58111.6 Image Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584Part 3 Digital Speech and Audio Processing .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .593Chapter 12 Speech and Audio Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59512.1 Sound Waves and Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595
12.2 Digital Representation of Audio Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59612.3 Signal Processing with Embedded Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60812.4 Speech Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61112.5 VoIP and Jitter Buffer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 626Chapter 13 Audio Coding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63713.1 Psychoacoustics and Perceptual Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63713.2 Audio Signals Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64213.3 MPEG-4 AAC Codec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64713.4 Popular Audio Codecs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65113.5 Audio Post-Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 653Part 4 Digital Video Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .657Chapter 14 Video Coding Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65914.1 Introduction .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65914.2 Video Coding Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66114.3 MPEG-2 Decoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67514.4 H.264 Decoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68114.5 Scalable Video Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 709Chapter 15 Video Post-Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71315.1 Video Quality Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71315.2 Video Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71315.3 Video Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72815.4 Video Transcoding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .745

 2021-05-11 05:35:26 |  123 | Naser

OReilly Media photo

دانلود کتاب Jquery mobile up and running
Author: OReilly Media
Pages: 270
دوره   آموزش JQuery
با استفاده از HTML5 برای برنامه های تحت وب، صفحات سازگار با تبلت و گوشی های هوشمند طراحی نمایید
اگر می خواهید یک برنامه ی تحت وب بنویسید که با تمامی دستگاه های هوشمند از جمله iPad، Kindle Fire، iPhone و Android سازگار است، این کتاب مرجع مناسب و پاسخگوی نیاز شما می باشد. از طریق یک سری تمرین عملی، یاد بگیرید چگونه از کامپوننت های متعدد طراحی رابط کاربری (UI Component) برای ساخت اپلیکیشن های قابل تنظیم و سازگار با چندین محیط (multiplatform) بهره بگیرید. برای شروع به یادگیری jQuery به هیچ تجربه ی عملی در زمینه ی برنامه نویسی یا استفاده از jQuery نیاز نخواهید داشت.       
پس از مطالعه ی کامل این کتاب، قادر خواهید بود با استفاده از jQuery mobile و کد HTML5 رابط های کاربری واکنش گرا و مبتنی بر تکنولوژی ajax تولید کنید که با انواع تبلت و گوشی هوشمند سازگار می باشد.
 



 
 


 
 


ISBN:
978-1-4493-9765-4


Year:
2012


Pages:
270


Language:
English


File size:
21.8 MB


File format:
PDF



Would you like to build one mobile web application that works on iPadand Kindle Fire as well as iPhone and Android smartphones? This introductory guide to jQuery Mobile shows you how. Through a series of hands-on exercises youll learn the best ways to use this frameworks many interface components to build customizable multiplatform apps. You dont need any programming skills or previous experience with jQuery to get started.
By the time you finish this book youll know how to create responsive Ajax-based interfaces that work on a variety of smartphones and tablets using jQuery Mobile and semantic HTML5 code.

 2021-05-07 02:41:21 |  137 | Naser

fabrice marguerie photo

LINQ in Action
Author: fabrice marguerie
Pages: 572
PART 1 GETTING STARTED ....................................................... 11 ■ Introducing LINQ 32 ■ C# and VB.NET language enhancements 443 ■ LINQ building blocks 82PART 2 QUERYING OBJECTS IN MEMORY ............................... 1134 ■ Getting familiar with LINQ to Objects 1155 ■ Beyond basic in-memory queries 160PART 3 QUERYING RELATIONAL DATA................................... 2036 ■ Getting started with LINQ to SQL 2057 ■ Peeking under the covers of LINQ to SQL 2378 ■ Advanced LINQ to SQL features 267PART 4 MANIPULATING XML ............................................... 3119 ■ Introducing LINQ to XML 31310 ■ Query and transform XML with LINQ to XML 35011 ■ Common LINQ to XML scenarios 385
PART 5 LINQING IT ALL TOGETHER..................................... 43512 ■ Extending LINQ 43713 ■ LINQ in every layer 482

 2021-05-12 08:21:39 |  166 | Naser

Richard Wagner photo

Professional iPhone™ and iPod® touch Programming
Author: Richard Wagner
Pages: 313
Chapter 1: Introducing the iPhone and iPod touch Development Platform . . . . 1Chapter 2: Designing a User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13Chapter 3: Implementing the Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33Chapter 4: Styling with CSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83Chapter 5: Handling Touch Interactions and Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101Chapter 6: Advanced Programming Topics: Canvas and Video . . . . . . . . . . . 121Chapter 7: Integrating with iPhone Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153Chapter 8: Enabling and Optimizing Web Sitesfor iPhone and iPod touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179Chapter 9: Bandwidth and Performance Optimizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209Chapter 10: Packaging Apps as Bookmarks:Bookmarklets and Data URLs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221Chapter 11: Case Studies: Beyond Edge-to-Edge Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237Chapter 12: Testing and Debugging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279

 2021-05-09 19:48:18 |  164 | Naser

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Beginning ASP.NET MVC 4
Author: José Rolando Guay Paz
Pages: 292
دوره آموزش MVC
 
About the Author ...............................................................................................................xiii

 2021-05-06 06:46:02 |  162 | Naser

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Creating HTML5 Animations with Flash and Wallaby
Author: Ian L.m clean
Pages: 62
1. Flash Professional Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1The Flash Platform 2Flash Professional at a Glance 3The Library 4The Stage 4The Timeline 5Importing Assets 6Drawing Shapes 7Working with Images 8Knowing When to Use Bitmaps or Shapes 9Avoiding Undesired Scaling in Bitmaps 9Converting Assets to Symbols 10Instances 11Keyframes 12Tweening 122. Creating a Basic HTML5 Animation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15Creating a New Project 15Creating the Text 16Animating the Marquis 18Exporting the HTML5 Animation from Wallaby 213. Creating Advanced Animations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23Building for Performance 24Export and Test Often 25Take the Right Approach 25Stay Mindful of Bandwidth 26Determine the Limitations 26Wallaby-Specific Performance Tips 27

 2021-05-09 17:10:26 |  140 | Naser

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Professional Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 Programming
Author: RobVieira
Pages: 938
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxvChapter 1: Being Objective: Re-Examining Objects in SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . 1Chapter 2: Tool Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19Chapter 3: Asking a Better Question: Advanced Queries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37Chapter 4: XML Integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67Chapter 5: Daring to Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113Chapter 6: Core Storage and Index Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147Chapter 7: More Advanced Index Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189Chapter 8: Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237Chapter 9: Scripts and Batches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255Chapter 10: Advanced Programmability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283Chapter 11: Transactions and Locks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335Chapter 12: Triggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367Chapter 13: SQL Cursors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399Chapter 14: Reporting Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435Chapter 15: Buying in Bulk: The Bulk Copy Program (BCP) and OtherBasicBulkOperations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .473Chapter 16: Getting Integrated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493Chapter 17: Replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513Chapter 18: Looking at Things in Full: Full-Text Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555Chapter 19: Feeling Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579Chapter 20: A Grand Performance: Designing a DatabaseThat Performs Well . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617Chapter 21: What Comes After: Forensic Performance Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637Chapter 22: Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 655Chapter 23: SMO: SQLManagement Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 705Chapter 24: Data Warehousing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727Chapter 25: BeingWell Connected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 751Appendix A: System Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 753Appendix B: Going Meta: Getting Data About Your Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815Appendix C: The Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 841Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 861

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 2021-05-12 10:16:33 |  157 | Naser


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Visual QuickStart Guide CSS3
Author: Jason Cranford Teague
Pages: 457
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvChapter 1 understanding Css3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1Chapter 2 HTML5 Primer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15Chapter 3 Css Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33Chapter 4 selective styling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69Chapter 5 font Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117Chapter 6 Text Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151Chapter 7 Color and Background Properties . . . . . . . . . 179Chapter 8 List and Table Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213Chapter 9 user Interface and generatedContent Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229Chapter 10 Box Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241Chapter 11 Visual formatting Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279Chapter 12 Transformation and Transition Properties. . . . . 303Chapter 13 fixing Css . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323Chapter 14 essential Css Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343Chapter 15 Managing style sheets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361Appendix A Css Quick reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393Appendix B HTML and uTf Character encoding . . . . . . . . 407Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413

 2021-05-12 13:32:51 |  139 | Naser

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JavaScript Testing
Author: liang yuxian eugene
Pages: 272
دوره آموزش Javascript
Chapter 1: What is JavaScript Testing? 7Where does JavaScript fit into the web page? 8HTML Content 8Time for action – building a HTML document 9Styling HTML elements using its attributes 11Specifying id and class name for an HTML element 12Cascading Style Sheets 12Time for action – styling your HTML document using CSS 14Referring to an HTML element by its id or class name and styling it 18Differences between a class selector and an id selector 19Other uses for class selectors and id selectors 20Complete list of CSS attributes 20JavaScript providing behavior to a web page 20Time for action – giving behavior to your HTML document 20JavaScript Syntax 24JavaScript events 26Finding elements in a document 26Putting it all together 28The difference between JavaScript and server-side languages 29Why pages need to work without JavaScript 30What is testing? 31Why do you need to test? 31Types of errors 32Loading errors 33Time for action – loading errors in action 33Partially correct JavaScript 34Time for action – loading errors in action 35Runtime errors 36Time for action – runtime errors in action 36Logic errors 37
Time for action – logic errors in action 38Some advice for writing error-free JavaScript 40Always check for proper names of objects variables and functions 40Check for proper syntax 40Plan before you code 40Check for correctness as you code 40Preventing errors by choosing a suitable text editor 41Summary 41Chapter 2: Ad Hoc Testing and Debugging in JavaScript 43The purpose of ad hoc testing–getting the script to run 44What happens when the browser encounters an error in JavaScript 44Browser differences and the need to test in multiple browsers 45Time for action – checking for features and sniffing browsers 46Testing browser differences via capability testing 47Time for action – capability testing for different browsers 48Are you getting the correct output and putting values in the correct places? 50Accessing the values on a form 50Time for action – accessing values from a form 51Another technique for accessing form values 54Accessing other parts of the web page 55Time for action – getting the correct values in the correct places 55Does the script give the expected result 65What to do if the script doesnt run? 65Visually inspecting the code 66Using alert() to see what code is running 66Using alert() to see what values are being used 67Time for action – using alert to inspect your code 67A less obtrusive way to check what code is running and the values used 71Time for action – unobtrusively checking what values are used 72Commenting out parts of the script to simplify testing 75Time for action – simplifying the checking process 76Timing differences–making sure that the HTML is there before interacting with it 77Why ad hoc testing is never enough 78Summary 79Chapter 3: Syntax Validation 81The difference between validating and testing 82Code that is valid but wrong–validation doesnt find all the errors 83Code that is invalid but right 83Code that is invalid and wrong–validation finds some errors that mightbe difficult to spot any other way 83

 2021-05-06 06:45:38 |  134 | Naser

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Android for work
Author: Marziah Karch
Pages: 309
■Contents .......................................................................................................... v ■About the Author .......................................................................................... xiii ■About the Technical Reviewer.......................................................................xiv ■Acknowledgments..........................................................................................xv ■Preface ..........................................................................................................xvi ■Chapter 1: Buying and Activating an Android Phone ...................................... 1 ■Chapter 2: Using Your Phone for the First Time ............................................ 15 ■Chapter 3: Going Online with Android ........................................................... 27 ■Chapter 4: Android Calling ............................................................................ 39 ■Chapter 5: Managing Texting ........................................................................ 51 ■Chapter 6: Wrangling Your E-mail................................................................. 61 ■Chapter 7: The Calendar ................................................................................ 79 ■Chapter 8: Android in a Microsoft World....................................................... 93 ■Chapter 9: Photos and Video ....................................................................... 103 ■Chapter 10: Web Browsing.......................................................................... 121 ■Chapter 11: Social Media and Work ............................................................ 139 ■Chapter 12: Maps and Mobile...................................................................... 159 ■Chapter 13: The Remaining Android Apps................................................... 173 ■Chapter 14: The Android Market ................................................................. 187 ■Chapter 15: General Business Applications ................................................ 211 ■Chapter 16: Specialized Apps for Professionals.......................................... 233 ■Chapter 17: Advanced Customization and Troubleshooting........................ 255 ■Appendix A: Resources for Managing Enterprise-Wide Android Deployment ................................................................ 267 ■Appendix B: Resources for Developing Android Apps ................................. 269 ■Index............................................................................................................ 275

 2021-05-08 05:42:22 |  131 | Naser

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JavaScript Testing with Jasmine
Author: Evan Hahn
Pages: 50
دوره آموزش Javascript
1. Intro to Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1What Is Software Testing? 1Why Is It Useful? 2Test-Driven Development 2Behavior-Driven Development 22. Jasmine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5What Is Jasmine? 5Getting Set Up with Jasmine 5Testing Existing Code with describe it and expect 6An Example to Test 6Jasmine Time! 7Matchers 8Writing the Tests First with Test-Driven Development 93. Writing Good Tests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13Cardinal Rule: When in Doubt Test 13Test Components 13Black-Box Testing 144. Matchers in Depth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15Equality: toEqual 15Identity: toBe 15Yes or No? toBeTruthy toBeFalsy 16Negate Other Matchers with not 17Check If an Element Is Present with toContain 17Is It Defined? toBeDefined toBeUndefined 18
Nullness: toBeNull 18Is It NaN? toBeNaN 18Comparators: toBeGreaterThan toBeLessThan 19Nearness: toBeCloseTo 19Using toMatch with Regular Expressions 20Checking If a Function Throws an Error with toThrow 20Custom Matchers 205. More Jasmine Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23Before and After 23Nested Suites 24Skipping Specs and Suites 24Matching Class Names 256. Spies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27The Basics: Spying on a Function 27Calling Through: Making Your Spy Even Smarter 29Making Sure a Spy Returns a Specific Value 30Replacing a Function with a Completely Different Spy 30Creating a New Spy Function 30Creating a New Spy Object 317. Using Jasmine with Other Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33Jasmine and CoffeeScript 33Jasmine and Node.js 34Installing jasmine-node on Unix and Linux 34Installing jasmine-node on Windows 34Basic Usage 34Asynchronous Tests with jasmine-node 35jasmine-node and CoffeeScript 35Jasmine and Ruby on Rails 36Installation 36Usage 36Jasmine with Non-Rails Ruby 37More Tools 378. Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39Jasmine on the Web 39The Basic Structure of a Suite 39Matchers Reference 40List of Falsy Values 40Reserved Words in Jasmine 40

 2021-05-06 06:45:31 |  122 | Naser

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Essential LINQ
Author: charlie calvert
Pages: 597
1 Introduction 12 Getting Started 133 The Essence of LINQ 394 C# 3.0 Technical Overview 655 Writing Query Expressions 1296 Query Operators 1757 A Quick Tour of LINQ to SQL 2318 Reading Objects with LINQ to SQL 2479 Modifying Objects with LINQ to SQL 28110 Using Stored Procedures and Database Functionswith LINQ to SQL 31911 Customizing Entity Persistence and Adding Business Logic 33712 LINQ to Entities Overview 34913 LINQ to XML: Creation 369
14 Querying and Editing XML 38715 XML Namespaces Transforms and Schema Validation 42316 Introduction to LINQ Patterns and Practices 46517 LINQ Everywhere 48718 Conclusion 515A Tips for Developers 519

 2021-05-11 05:57:21 |  155 | Naser

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Codecharts Roadmaps and Blueprints for Object-Oriented Programs
Author: Amnon H. Eden
Pages: 276
Preface xiAcknowledgements xiiiGuide to the Reader xvCodecharts xixPropositions xxvPrologue 11.􀀂 Motivation 32.􀀂 Design Description Languages 72.1 Theory Versus Practice 92.2 Decidability 112.3 Abstraction 122.4 Elegance 163.􀀂 An Overview of Codecharts 193.1 Object-Orientation 193.2 Visualization 233.3 Rigour 263.4 Automated Verifiability 283.5 Scalability 303.6 Genericity 323.7 Minimality 333.8 Information Neglect 344.􀀂 UML Versus Codecharts 375.􀀂 Historical Notes 43
PART I: Practice 456. Modelling Small Programs 476.1 Modelling Individual Classes 496.2 Modelling Individual Methods 506.3 Modelling Properties 536.4 􀀍 Modelling Implementation Minutia 556.5 Modelling Simple Relations 566.6 Modelling Indirect Relations 646.7 􀀍 Subtyping 667. Modelling Large Programs 717.1 Modelling Sets of Classes 757.2 Modelling Total Relations Between Sets 777.3 Modelling Sets of Methods (Clans) 817.4 􀀍 Modelling Isomorphic Relations 837.5 Modelling Sets of Methods (Tribes) 857.6 Modelling Class Hierarchies 907.7 Modelling Methods in Hierarchies 937.8 Modelling Properties of Sets 977.9 􀀍 Case Study: Total Versus. Isomorphic 987.10 Case Study: JDOM 1017.11 Case Study: Java 3D 1038. 􀀍 Modelling Industry-Scale Programs 1098.1 Modelling Sets of Hierarchies 1118.2 Modelling Sets of Sets of Methods (Clans) 1128.3 Modelling Sets of Sets of Methods (Tribes) 1158.4 Modelling Total Relations Revisited 1188.5 Modelling Isomorphic Relations Revisited 1209. Modelling Design Motifs 12710. Modelling Application Frameworks 13310.1 Case Study: Enterprise JavaBeans 13510.2 Case Study: JUnit 13611. Modelling Design Patterns 13911.1 Case Study: The Composite Pattern 140
11.2 Case Study: The Iterator Pattern 14511.3 Case Study: The Factory Method Pattern 14911.4 􀀍 Case Study: The Abstract Factory Pattern 15411.5 􀀍 Concluding Remarks 15712. Modelling Early Design Revisited 15913.􀀂􀀍 Advanced Modelling Techniques 16113.1 Ad Hoc Symbols 16113.2 Modelling Information Hiding 164PART II: Theory 16714. Abstract Semantics 16914.1 Finite Structures 17014.2 Abstract Semantics Functions 17414.3 Design Models 17414.4 Program Modelling Revisited 17715. Verification 17915.1 Verifying Closed Specifications 18015.2 Verifying Open Specifications 18315.3 Verifying Pattern Implementations 18615.4 Tool Support for Automated Verification 18816. 􀀂􀀍 Schemas 19117. LePUS3 in Classical Logic 19517.1 LePUS3 and Class-Z as First-Order Languages 19517.2 Specifications in the Predicate Logic 19617.3 The Axioms of Class-Based Programs 19818. Reasoning about Charts 201Appendix I: The Gang of Four Companion 213Appendix II:􀀂 Formal Definitions 229
Appendix III:􀀂 UML Quick Reference 233References 235Index 239

 2021-05-12 01:30:50 |  131 | Naser

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UML Tutorial
Author: Robert C. Martin
Pages: 7
در این کتاب فارسی تمام سولات مربوط به UMLوRUP سعی شده پاسخ داده شود کافی است بر روی نام کتاب کلیک کنید-

دانلود رایگان است



دوره آموش UML

دوره آموزش RUP

 2021-05-06 06:45:22 |  148 | Naser

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 2021-05-10 02:40:55 |  146 | Naser

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Microsoft SharePoint 2007 for Office 2007 Users
Author: Martin W. P. Reid
Pages: 457
Why All the Hype? 5Site Structure 6What Is MOSS 2007? 7Web Parts 8Windows SharePoint Services (WSS) Version 3 9Blogs 11Wikis 11Project Management 12Surveys 12Web-Based Discussions 12Calendars 12Offline Access 13Integration with Microsoft Office 14Alerts 14Item-Level Security 14Customization 15Mobile Device Access 15Email Updates 15Workflow 15Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 16Enterprise-Level Search 16People Search 17MySite 17Audiences 17Excel Services 18Forms Server 18Business Data Catalog 18Presence Management 19Reporting 19Document Center 19
Security 19Site Owner Permissions 20Site Member Permissions 20Site Visitor Permissions 20Document-Level Permissions 21Comparing WSS and MOSS Features 21On the Other Hand 22Accessibility 22Navigation 22Microsoft Solution 22Browser Support 23Desktop to Internet 25Summary 25Chapter 2: Sites and Workspaces 27A Little Planning 27Creating a Team Site 29Site Owners 31Create Menu 31Edit Page 32Site Settings Menu 32Quick Launch 34Default Quick Launch Links 35Global Menu 37Site Templates 37Team Site 38Blank Site 38Document Workspace 38Wiki Site 40Blog 40Meeting Workspaces 41Basic Meeting Workspace 41Blank Meeting Workspace 41Decision Meeting Workspace 41Social Meeting Workspace 42Multipage Meeting Workspace 42Creating a Meeting Workspace 42Create a Meeting Workspace from an Event 43The Enterprise Tab 43Publishing 46Free Application Templates 46Site Administrator Templates 47

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